Plane, European

Plane
Plane, European
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The timber resembles beech in colour, the heartwood being light reddish-brown, usually clearly defined from the lighter- coloured sapwood. The rays however, are broader and more numerous than those of beech, and produce on quarter-sawn surfaces, an attractive fleck figure, the reddish-brown rays contrasting with the lighter-coloured background, thus giving...
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Pine
Pine, Corsican
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The heartwood is light yellowish-brown clearly demarcated from the yellowish-white sapwood. It is similar in appearance to Scots pine, but the sapwood is wider, much wider in material grown in the UK while the texture is fairly coarse. The wood weighs 510 kg/m3 when dried, and often contains a greater...
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Pine
Pine, Elliotis
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Older trees yield material typically harder and heavier than most other commercial pines, comparable in strength qualities with good quality douglas fir. However, most commercial timber is from younger, plantation grown stock and is light in weight, brittle and soft. Sapwood usually about 50mm but up to 150mm wide. Heartwood...
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Pine
Pine, Ponderosa
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The wood varies considerably in colour; mature trees have a very thick, pale yellow sapwood, soft, non-resinous, uniform in texture, and similar to yellow pine (P. strobus). The heartwood is much darker, ranging from a deep yellow to a reddish-brown, and is considerably heavier than the sapwood. Resin ducts are...
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Oak
Oak, Japanese
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The timber is a uniform yellowish-brown, a little paler in colour than that of European or American white oak, and much milder in character, due to the slow, even growth. It weighs about 670 kg/m3 when dried. Timber from trees grown in the main island generally has a pinkish shade.
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Oak
Oak, Tasmanian
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The timbers of the three species are similar in appearance and are generally difficult to separate, nor is it usually necessary to do this, however the following descriptions give a guide to their separate identification. E. obliqua. The wood is usually of a pale to light-brown colour, but some Tasmanian...
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Louro
Louro
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The timber is light reddish brown to yellow brown with a golden sheen. The sapwood is well defined and grey or creamy brown in colour. The grain is interlocked and the texture medium.
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Meranti
Meranti, yellow
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Sapwood lighter in colour and moderately distinct from the heartwood, which is light-yellow-brown, often with a greenish or olive tinge, weathering to a light brown colour; planed surfaces without lustre, faint stripe figure on radial surfaces. The texture is moderately fine or moderately coarse but even, and the grain is...
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Hemlock
Hemlock, Western
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Neither the tree nor the timber bears close similarity to eastern hemlock. The timber of western hemlock is pale brown in colour and somewhat lustrous, with a straight grain and fairly even texture, non-resinous and non-tainting when dried, it has a faint sour odour when freshly sawn. The darker-coloured late-wood...
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Idigbo
Idigbo
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A plain, pale yellow to light brown coloured wood. sometimes relieved by a zonal figure originating in the growth rings, suggesting plain oak. There is little distinction between sapwood and heartwood, though the latter is somewhat darker in colour. The grain is straight to slightly irregular, and the texture is...
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