Tulipwood

Tulipwood
Tulipwood
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The sapwood is white, and in second-growth trees, very wide; the heartwood is variable in colour, ranging from olive green to yellow or brown, and may be streaked with steel-blue. The annual growth terminates in a white band of parenchyma giving a subdued figure to longitudinal surfaces. The wood is'...
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Pine
Pine, Scots
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The sapwood is creamy-white to yellow in colour, narrow, especially in northern environments, becoming wider in the southern areas, and the heartwood is pale yellowish-brown to reddish-brown, resinous, and usually distinct from the sapwood. The growth rings are clearly marked by the denser late-wood. The quality of the timber is...
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Redwood
Redwood, European
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The sapwood is creamy-white to yellow in colour, narrow, especially in northern environments, becoming wider in the southern areas, and the heartwood is pale yellowish-brown to reddish-brown, resinous, and usually distinct from the sapwood. The growth rings are clearly marked by the denser late-wood. The quality of the timber is...
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Pine
Pine, Corsican
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The heartwood is light yellowish-brown clearly demarcated from the yellowish-white sapwood. It is similar in appearance to Scots pine, but the sapwood is wider, much wider in material grown in the UK while the texture is fairly coarse. The wood weighs 510 kg/m3 when dried, and often contains a greater...
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Chestnut
Chestnut, Horse
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The wood is white to pale yellowish-brown, the rather rapid growth producing a soft, relatively light timber weighing about 510 kg/m3 when dried. The grain may be straight, but is more commonly spiral and the wood has a fine, close, even texture caused by the fine rays and minute pores,...
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Agba
Agba
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There is little difference in colour between the sapwood and the heartwood, the latter is slightly darker but the line of demarcation is somewhat indefinite. The wood varies from yellowish-pink to reddish brown (like a light coloured mahogany). Generally, it strongly resembles mahogany in grain etc. but is less lustrous...
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