Tulipwood

Tulipwood
Tulipwood
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The sapwood is white, and in second-growth trees, very wide; the heartwood is variable in colour, ranging from olive green to yellow or brown, and may be streaked with steel-blue. The annual growth terminates in a white band of parenchyma giving a subdued figure to longitudinal surfaces. The wood is'...
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Walnut
Walnut, African
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It is of a golden brown colour, marked with black streaks (caused by secretory tissue or 'gum lines'), which have given it the name 'walnut'. When planed the surface is distinctly lustrous The sapwood is narrow, buff or light brown in colour and normally sharply defined from the heartwood, although...
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Whitewood
Whitewood, European
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Silver fir: The timber closely resembles that of Norway spruce (Picea abies) but is slightly less lustrous. It is almost white in colour, with a yellowish-brown cast and faintly marked annual rings. The grain is straight, and the texture fine. The wood weighs 480 kg/m3 when dried. Spruce, Norway: There...
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Pine
Pine, Scots
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The sapwood is creamy-white to yellow in colour, narrow, especially in northern environments, becoming wider in the southern areas, and the heartwood is pale yellowish-brown to reddish-brown, resinous, and usually distinct from the sapwood. The growth rings are clearly marked by the denser late-wood. The quality of the timber is...
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Pine
Pine, Southern
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The sapwood is narrow in the better grades, sometimes up to 50mm wide, lighter in colour than the heartwood which is yellowish-brown to reddish-brown. Both species are typical of the hard-pine class, being resinous, with the growth-rings usually well-marked by the contrast between the light-coloured early-wood, and the dense, darker-coloured...
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Pine
Pine, Yellow
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The sapwood is almost white, and the heartwood varies from creamy-white to light straw-brown, or light reddish-brown. The wood is not particularly resinous, but resin ducts produce short, brown-coloured, thin lines on longitudinal surfaces. The grain is straight, and the texture is fine and even, planed surfaces have a satin-like...
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Redwood
Redwood, European
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The sapwood is creamy-white to yellow in colour, narrow, especially in northern environments, becoming wider in the southern areas, and the heartwood is pale yellowish-brown to reddish-brown, resinous, and usually distinct from the sapwood. The growth rings are clearly marked by the denser late-wood. The quality of the timber is...
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Pine
Pine, Maritime
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Similar to Scots pine in appearance, but more resinous, coarser-textured, with a greater preponderance of knots, and a wider sapwood. It is an important source of resin extraction in parts of Europe, and since tapping encourages the formation of resin within the tree, this results in variations in the weight...
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Pine
Pine, Patula
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Sapwood is not easily distinguishable from heartwood. Early wood is almost white while late wood is pale brown. Numerous small resin canals, visible to the naked eye and prominent on tangential surfaces. Grain may be straight, spiral or wavy. Logs and sawn timber susceptible to blue stain.
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Pine
Pine, Ponderosa
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The wood varies considerably in colour; mature trees have a very thick, pale yellow sapwood, soft, non-resinous, uniform in texture, and similar to yellow pine (P. strobus). The heartwood is much darker, ranging from a deep yellow to a reddish-brown, and is considerably heavier than the sapwood. Resin ducts are...
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