Courbaril

Courbaril

Durability

Density in kg/m3

Courbaril

The Tree
Hymenaea species are generally large trees, growing to a height of 40.0m but more usually 30.0m or a little less, and a diameter of 0.6m to 1.2m. The trunk is usually free of branches for 1 2.0m to 24.0m, well formed and basally swollen or buttressed in large trees.

The Timber
The heartwood is salmon-red to orange-brown, becoming russet to reddish-brown when seasoned. The sapwood is usually wide, and white, grey, or pinkish, sharply demarcated from the heartwood. The grain may be straight, but is more commonly interlocked, and the texture is medium to coarse.The heartwood is frequently marked with dark streaks and sometimes shows a golden lustre. It weighs about 910 kg/m3 when dried.

Drying
Slightly difficult to air dry, with a slight tendency to warp, check and caseharden.

Strength
Courbaril is a very strong, hard, tough wood, generally superior to oak in all properties except compression perpendicular to the grain in which both species are slightly inferior to oak.

Working Qualities
Medium - difficult. Its high density makes courbaril moderately difficult to work. It nails badly, but holds screws well. It turns satisfactorily, glues well, finishes smoothly, but does not take a high polish.

Latin Name
Hymenaea spp, Hymenaea courbaril

Also known as
jatoba (Brazil), jatai, farinheira, jatai amarelo, jatai vermelho (Brazil), locust (West Indes, Central America) Guapinol (Nicaragua)

Wood Type
Hardwood

Treatability
No information

Moisture
Medium

Texture
Medium to coarse

Origin
Brazil, Bolivia, Peru, Central America, Mexico, Nicaragua