Strength properties

Date Published

27 August 2022

Document Type

Category

Author

TRADA
Summary

In general terms, steel and concrete are both homogenous, being uniform in structure, and isotropic, having the same strength properties in all directions. However, in order to understand how timber behaves as a structural material it is necessary to understand that it has different strength properties in the longitudinal and transverse directions, and that it is the arrangement of the cells in timber that determine its strength and behaviour under different loads. Understanding the structure of wood will explain, for example, why it is up to 40 times stiffer in the longitudinal direction than the transverse direction.

Key Information

Timber has different strength properties in the longitudinal and transverse directions, and it is the arrangement of the cells in timber that determine its strength and behaviour under different loads.

Many factors affect the strength properties of timber: for example material properties, and climatic and environmental growth conditions.

The Modulus of Elasticity (MOE) and the Modulus of Rupture (MOR) are the two most important factors in the way timber responds to stress in the application of a load.

Case studies

On Tiree, as on other Hebridean islands, the traditional dwelling is the ‘black house’, a small, usually single storey dwelling of white painted rubble walls with a steeply pitched roof of thatch, slate or tarred bitumen.

The Woodland Trust is a charity devoted to the conservation of the UK’s woodland. Its new headquarters in Grantham, by Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios, aims to communicate the mission and values of the Trust and, in practical terms, to accommodate 200 workstations in open plan office space.